We connect the UN Global Goals

with art

Art for a Healthy Planet

Sharing great art to inspire action for climate, our environment, and biodiversity

Breathe with Me

Jeppe Hein & ART 2030

GOALS

Christian Falsnaes

Planet Art

Amapá

ART 2030 New York 2019

Art for Climate Change

ART 2030 New York 2018

For Art and the Global Goals

Tow with The Flow

Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen

YES

Yoko Ono

Soleil Levant

Ai Weiwei

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Art for a Healthy Planet

2020

Campaign

Image above: Adrián Villar Rojas. The Most Beautiful of All Mothers, 2015. Organic, inorganic, human and machine-made matter including cement, resin, white polyurethane paint, lacquer, sand, soil, rocks, fishing nets, wood, snails, raw beef, corals, mollusc shells, feathers, petrified wood, collected in Istanbul, Kalba, Mexico City and Ushuaia. Installation view on the shore of Leon Trotsky’s former house on Büyükada Island, 14th Istanbul Biennial, 2015. Produced with the support of Marian Goodman Gallery, kurimanzutto and Fondazione Giuliani. Courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/London/Paris and kurimanzutto, Mexico City and New York. Photo credit: Jörg Baumann.

The window is closing to safeguard a healthy planet, yet solutions are insight. With so much at stake, it is time to join the declared climate & biodiversity emergency and take the pledge to reduce our collective impact on the environment.


In 2020, ART 2030 works together with the art sector, the SDG sector and beyond, to share great art and strong initiatives and exemplify the powerful stories from art. We belive these stories will galvanize global action for the critical issues of climate, environment, biodiversity and health of our planet.


Marking major moments such as Earth Day, International Day of Biodiversity, World Environment Day and more, the Art for a Healthy Planet campaign, brings awareness of all forms of life to the forefront.


Help us share these stories and explore the #ArtforaHealthyPlanet stories with your network on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook now!

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Adrián Villar Rojas. The Most Beautiful of All Mothers, 2015. Organic, inorganic, human and machine-made matter including cement, resin, white polyurethane paint, lacquer, sand, soil, rocks, fishing nets, wood, snails, raw beef, corals, mollusc shells, feathers, petrified wood, collected in Istanbul, Kalba, Mexico City and Ushuaia. Installation view on the shore of Leon Trotsky’s former house on Büyükada Island, 14th Istanbul Biennial, 2015. Produced with the support of Marian Goodman Gallery, kurimanzutto and Fondazione Giuliani. Courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/London/Paris and kurimanzutto, Mexico City and New York. Photo credit: Jörg Baumann.

In 2015, the Argentinian artist Adrián Villar Rojas brought over twenty-nine sculptures of animals to the 14th Istanbul Biennale with his work: The Most Beautiful of All Mothers: lions carried bisons, horses bore the weight of rhinos, a family of giraffes stood ahead. Villar Rojas once suggested that ‘these animals rise like zombies or monsters of the mind from the sea, return from whence we all came, the primal broth of life, and are the last inhabitants on earth, who have returned, in some imaginary future, after the catastrophes of the Anthropocene, to haunt and reclaim the land’.


We are on the brink of the sixth mass extinction, and the scientific community continue to report unprecedented rates of rapid decline of life and ecosystems around the world. However according to the IBPES Global Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystems, if we do not turn the current negative trends in biodiversity and ecosystems, 80% of the Global Goals targets on poverty, health, water, cities, climates and more will not be met by 2030.


The livelihood of humankind of infinitely interlinked with the health and balance of all lives that live around us. From the individual to the national, we all have a role to play preventing a sixth mass extinction. See more about how you can learn, share and act at www.worldenvironmentday.global

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In 2020-21, one of our key focuses is on the issues of biodiversity. Working with field experts, we aim to raise awareness about the topic across the art sector and beyond, to empower actions through art - we trust that these actions, will inspire the entire planet to create real impact and change.



We depend on Earth’s biodiversity and ecosystems. 30-50% of the Gross Global Product that we humans consume comes from nature. Still it is our least appreciated resource. We are facing the effects of the global biodiversity crisis, where we have caused the extinction of species at a rate we haven’t seen in 65 million years, and where we have disturbed up to 70% of Earth’s natural ecosystems. Our ignorance towards the consequences of this is evident, and the current COVID-19 pandemic might be a consequence of this. That is, these disturbances, whether through climate change, habitat destruction, or habitat and interspecies crowding – has been reported to increase the transfer of disease from wild species to humans, making the entire planet less resilient to health disasters. Biodiversity is what makes our Earth function and resilient, which is a prerequisite for natures contribution to people and for stable human societies. Our wellbeing depends upon the rich and abundant life-giving systems that biodiversity offers us - clean air, water, healthy soil and diverse ecosystems that are fundamental to a prosperous life on Earth. Yet we are losing biodiversity at an alarming rate, and if we continue at this pace, our world will cease functioning; nature – we cannot afford to live without it.


Given this, we are at a unique moment in time to reset our perspective and relationship to nature and biodiversity. Science is key to understanding the drivers of biodiversity loss and how to reverse it, and now is the time to work with the innovators, the thinkers, the artists to galvanize public demand to act. We simply cannot afford not to.



  • Professor, Dr. Carsten Rahbek
    20th May 2020, GLOBE Institute, University of Copenhagen


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Image 1: Robert Rauschenberg, Earth Day, 1970. Lithograph with chine collé, 52 1/2 x 37 1/2 inches (133.4 x 95.3 cm). From an edition of 50, published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles ©Robert Rauschenberg Foundation and Gemini G.E.L. | Image 2: Robert Rauschenberg, Earth Day, 1990. Screenprint and pochoir on paper. 64 x 42 1/2 inches (162.6 x 108 cm). From an edition of 75, published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles ©Robert Rauschenberg Foundation and Gemini G.E.L.

In 1970, Robert Rauschenberg created the first poster for the occasion of the first annual Earth Day on April 22 of that year, a day conceived to raise awareness about the threat of global air and water pollution. In Earth Day (1970), Robert Rauschenberg juxtaposes images of the endangered gorilla, decaying and polluted landscapes, contaminated waters, littered junkyards against the focal point of the bald eagle - a symbolic image emanating a sense of responsibility and a call to action.


Twenty years later in 1990, Rauschenberg commemorated Earth Day once again with Earth Day (1990). Layering images of trees, plants and bark with the natural hues of green, brown and red, Earth Day (1990) brought humankind’s relationship with our environment to the forefront.


Renowned for his artistic approach alongside his activism and passion for social and political causes, Rauschenberg leaves behind a legacy that continues to inspire generations of artists and activists. Today, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation continues to include care for the environment in its mission, and continues to foster the passion of Robert Rauschenberg through philanthropic activities.

Yoko Ono, I LOVE YOU EARTH. Vocals, words and music by Yoko Ono © Ono Music (BMI), produced by Yoko Ono and Thomas Bartlett, drawings by Yoko Ono, animated by Jonny Sanders © Yoko Ono, 2018. From the album, Yoko Ono - Warzone, on Chimera Music, released October 19, 2018. http://yokoonowarzone.com

Yoko Ono’s tireless activism is at the heart of her work as an artist. She believes that activism can - and should - take many forms, and her range of concerns is similarly broad: world peace, but also the environment, gun control and social issues, including feminism. By encouraging people to “Think Peace, Act Peace, Spread Peace, Imagine Peace”, Ono believes the world can change. The billboard’s (top) message comes from the lyrics of Ono’s 1985 song, “I Love You Earth” (above), a piece that expresses the very power of positivity, and encourages viewers to celebrate and connect with our planet.

Acknowledging #ArtforaHealthyPlanet partners and supporters

As well as #ArtforaHealthyPlanet participants

ART 2030's biodiversity focus in 2020-21 is generously supported by

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